How to Choose The Elements of Your Marketing Plan

Brian Bennett

STIR | President
Aug 7

Are you taking a holistic view of integrated marketing planning? Whether you are a chief marketing officer for a major corporation or own a small business, you should periodically step back and look at the big picture. You may be missing opportunities to design integration, efficiency, leverage, and ultimately, power, into your marketing effort.

Think of your marketing effort like a spider’s web. The more points of intersection that exists, the more connected elements there are, the more brand surface area you create, the more effective you will be at connecting and engaging the target. Just as the spider’s web has a beautifully organized and unique master design that is efficient and strong, so should your plan.

Most campaigns need certain core elements such as:

  • Broad awareness and image maintenance
  • Ongoing and week-to-week updates and promotion
  • Distribution or trade or retail network support
  • Promotion or sales incentives
  • Community support

The tendency is to plan and build these unique projects to address specific needs independently. However, there is a great opportunity in connecting these efforts with an over-arching theme.

When developing detailed strategy and execution, you need to select a palate of communications elements to impact your key audiences with these programs, including the choice of marketing platform and media. This is a critical phase in the process. While there is a seemingly endless matrix of rationale for choosing the palate of marketing platform and media – there are some broad directional considerations that can help you determine those building blocks. 

You can benefit from the spreadsheet by either reviewing and selecting the marketing benefit you wish to derive, or by choosing the marketing element and cross checking its key benefits, constraints and relative cost. Low budget marketers such as small businesses may need to confine themselves to lower budget tactics. In addition, we’ve included some food for thought – starting points for the connection of integrated tactics.

Don’t relegate a review of your marketing plan to tomorrow; it is crucial that you take a fresh and unique look at your marketing mix – and that you are not driven by mirroring what has been done in the past or what may be excepted in your industry. This is your opportunity to innovate and make a difference. Dare to be bold.